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Strip Mining In Appalachia Special Collections Research

Surface mining, strip mining, and mountaintop removal are terms that are often incorrectly used interchangeably. This pathfinder focuses on the history of strip mining in Appalachia including grass roots resistance, cultural and environmental impact, and to a lesser extent, coal industry depictions of strip mining and its impact on Appalachia.

Appalachia’s Strip-Mined Mountains Face a Growing Climate

Nov 21, 2019 Across Appalachian coal country, mining companies, flood victims, environmental advocates and academic researchers have debated the extent to which strip mining contributes to flooding, sometimes

Kentucky was devastated for decades by mountaintop removal

Feb 13, 2020 Before strip mining, the Appalachian foothills and mountains were covered in uninterrupted forest. Today it is a patchwork quilt of mining

Plundering Appalachia The Tragedy of Mountaintop-Removal

Mountaintop removal is strip-mining on steroids. Massive dump trucks, huge bulldozers, and ten-story-high draglines can undo in months what geological processes took millions of years to build. Typically, multiple coal seams are exposed as a mountaintop-removal operation dismantles the

Coal left Appalachia devastated. Now it’s doing the same

Jul 09, 2019 Appalachia, which has been ground into codependent poverty by the coal industry over the course of a century, has been declining, in coal output and employment, for decades.

Kentucky was devastated for decades by mountaintop removal

Feb 13, 2020 Before strip mining, the Appalachian foothills and mountains were covered in uninterrupted forest. Today it is a patchwork quilt of mining and bare earth that, traditionally, had been replaced

Appalachia’s Strip-Mined Mountains Face a Growing Climate

Nov 21, 2019 Across Appalachian coal country, mining companies, flood victims, environmental advocates and academic researchers have debated the extent to which strip mining contributes to flooding, sometimes

Mountaintop Mining Is Destroying More Land for Less Coal

Jul 26, 2018 Strip mining across the mountaintops of Appalachia is scarring as much as three times more land to get a ton of coal than just three decades ago, new research shows. The data and a

Coal Mining Appalachia: Southern U.S.A Culture, History

Coal mining continues in the Southern Appalachian region today. The physical scars of mechanized strip mining can be seen throughout the hills. But it is the social and economic scars on the region itself that remain below the surface. For more information on coal mining history in Appalachia and elsewhere, check out this site: Kentucky Coal

Plundering Appalachia The Tragedy of Mountaintop-Removal

Appalachia, a region of extraordinary beauty and natural diversity, is under attack. Mountaintop removal is strip mining on steroids—a radically destructive form of surface mining whereby coal companies bulldoze the forest, decapitate the peaks with explosives, push the shattered rubble into adjacent valleys, and destroy the ecologically crucial headwater streams that had been there before.

Human Health Impacts > Appalachian Voices

Heavily strip-mined communities in Appalachia are among the unhealthiest in the U.S. In 2013, the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index ranked Kentucky and West Virginia — the two states where mountaintop removal is most prevalent — second to last, and dead last in

Environmental justice and coal mining in Appalachia

Coal production. Appalachia is one of three coal-mining regions in the United States; the others are the Interior coal region, and the Western coal region, which includes the Powder River Basin.Eight states lie in the Appalachian coal region: Alabama, eastern Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. West Virginia is the largest coal-producing state in

Our History The Alliance for Appalachia

The Appalachian region boasts a long, proud history of resistance by individuals, organizations, and alliances working to stop strip mining abuses in the region, beginning in the 1960s. The Appalachian Coalition Against Strip Mining formalized some of these efforts in the 1970s by working with a national coalition of groups from coalfields

Coal Controversy In Appalachia NASA

Although employment in the coal industry has declined over the past half-century, mining remains the backbone of West Virginia’s economy. Coalfield residents argue bitterly over whether some people’s jobs are more important than other people’s homes or the preservation of the area’s natural heritage.

Economics of Strip Mining > Appalachian Voices

Jun 29, 2006 Chris Irwin at United Mountain Defense just delivered one of the most awesome point-by-point refutation of every coal industry talking point ever. Stat-by-stat, and state-by-state, Chris refutes Congressman Duncan’s (R TN-1) silly hogwash about “jobs and economics and helping poor people” as the reason for continuing mountaintop removal and strip mining.

Effects of Strip Mining on the Appalachian Environment

Coal, Strip Mining, and its Environmental Effects 655 Words 3 Pages. Coal, Strip Mining, and its Environmental Effects Going to a school like Penn State entitles you to many advantages that smaller schools don’t have, such as diversity, world renowned professors, and several different majors to

Appalachia Has a Rich History of Women-Led Social Movements

Dec 07, 2019 She also became part of the anti-strip mining movement, and she helped to start an Appalachian women’s rights organization, which tried to center rural Appalachian working-class women in conversations about what women’s issues are. Land of Extraction: How Prison Industry Settled in Central Appalachia. The prison industry continues the

Mountaintop Mining Is Destroying More Land for Less Coal

Jul 26, 2018 Strip mining across the mountaintops of Appalachia is scarring as much as three times more land to get a ton of coal than just three decades ago, new research shows. The data and a

Coal Mining Appalachia: Southern U.S.A Culture, History

Coal mining continues in the Southern Appalachian region today. The physical scars of mechanized strip mining can be seen throughout the hills. But it is the social and economic scars on the region itself that remain below the surface. For more information on coal mining history in Appalachia and elsewhere, check out this site: Kentucky Coal

Plundering Appalachia The Tragedy of Mountaintop-Removal

Appalachia, a region of extraordinary beauty and natural diversity, is under attack. Mountaintop removal is strip mining on steroids—a radically destructive form of surface mining whereby coal companies bulldoze the forest, decapitate the peaks with explosives, push the shattered rubble into adjacent valleys, and destroy the ecologically crucial headwater streams that had been there before.

Effects of Strip Mining on the Appalachian Environment

Coal, Strip Mining, and its Environmental Effects 655 Words 3 Pages. Coal, Strip Mining, and its Environmental Effects Going to a school like Penn State entitles you to many advantages that smaller schools don’t have, such as diversity, world renowned professors, and several different majors to

appalachian strip mining sourena.de

appalachian strip mining. There are forty years of manufacturing history, with three major production bases,over 160 senior R&D engineers and 600+ large and medium-sized digital processing equipment, The first-line technicians and professional after-sales service personnel up to 2,300+ and 200+ respectively.Introducing advanced technology and craftsmanship, adopting international advanced

Appalachia’s Strip-Mined Mountains Face a Growing Climate

Nov 21, 2019 The Army Corps acknowledged at least as far back as 2000 that strip mining with valley fills could increase runoff. And a major environmental impact study on mountaintop mining published by the EPA in 2011 reported that storms can produce greater stream flows in watersheds with mountaintop mining and valley fills compared to unmined watersheds, especially in heavier rains.

strip mining Appalachian towns The Pop History Dig

Mar 21, 2014 As for the ever-vanishing Appalachian small town at the hand of strip mining, consider a comment made by Penney Loeb, who wrote the 1997 piece in U.S. News & World Report mentioned at the top of this sidebar, and also a 2007 book titled, Moving Mountains. Here she writes in 2003 about “disappearing towns” from her website:

Appalachia Has a Rich History of Women-Led Social Movements

Dec 07, 2019 She also became part of the anti-strip mining movement, and she helped to start an Appalachian women’s rights organization, which tried to center rural Appalachian working-class women in conversations about what women’s issues are. Land of Extraction: How Prison Industry Settled in Central Appalachia. The prison industry continues the

Economics of Strip Mining > Appalachian Voices

Jun 29, 2006 Chris Irwin at United Mountain Defense just delivered one of the most awesome point-by-point refutation of every coal industry talking point ever. Stat-by-stat, and state-by-state, Chris refutes Congressman Duncan’s (R TN-1) silly hogwash about “jobs and economics and helping poor people” as the reason for continuing mountaintop removal and strip mining.

Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness Radical

This may have been a fairly good representation of strip mining in Appalachia in 2006, however the passing of time should also be taken into account, as the subject is an ever-evolving industry. Reece spent a whole year, from September 2003 to September 2004, watching one mountain in Kentucky as it was destroyed for the purpose of extracting coal.